Friend or faux? Credit: BBC 
Friend or faux?
Credit: BBC 

Get real: 3 rules for avoiding fake whiskies

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No matter how much you spend, counterfeit whiskey is spreading faster than backlash against Kim Kardashian’s new shapewear line. George Koutsakis of Forbes.com offers these three tips to avoid getting burned by a fake or misleading bottle.

First, trust the seller, Koutsakis advises. “Buy from reputable retailers, sellers and well-known auction houses, and be sure to do your due diligence beforehand,” he says. “Often, even large companies that don’t specialize in whisky or spirits don’t have the proper experts in place to check for counterfeit products.”

Second, sweat the details: cask number, source, number of bottles released and so on. “The provenance and full details should be readily available, and if they are not, treat that as a warning sign.”

Third, Koutsakis warns, provenance is crucial. For example, Japanese whisky’s loose rules make it ripe for false advertising. “If it’s a single malt or single cask release from the well-known Japanese whisky makers, you’re safe,” Koutsakis says. “If it’s a blended whisky and an unknown company bottling it and promoting it, check again with a whisky specialist.” And repeat.🥃

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