We know a Glenlivet when we see one Credit: Ernie Button, National Geographic
We know a Glenlivet when we see one
Credit: Ernie Button, National Geographic

Fantastic planet: Finding new worlds in an empty Scotch glass

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If you thought a glass of whiskey couldn’t get any more beautiful, see here. At National Geographic, Daniel Stone explains how photographer Ernie Button has created a fantasy universe from the sediment left in a drained tumbler.

To make his images, Button takes pictures of the dried residue from a variety of Scotches, then trains multicoloured lights on their unique patterns. “The gray lines and swirls spring to life and make the rich designs resemble colorful landscapes of planets and moons,” Stone says.

Thanks to this artful treatment, plus some Photoshop work, Glenlivet produces lavalike waves, Balvenie yields what could be a glowing celestial body, and Macallan becomes a vortex resembling a blossom. Bottoms up!🥃 

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